Unemployment benefits in New York are generally available to those who are meet state law eligibility requirements. The newly enacted Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act also expands state unemployment insurance programs to provide benefits for individuals who might otherwise not qualify, and to increase the amount and duration of available benefits.

Eligibility

The Wage and Hour Division of the United States Department of Labor (USDOL) has enacted a temporary rule (“Rule”) regarding the implementation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The Rule clarifies the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) portions of the FFCRA.

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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect the nation, many employers have been forced to adjust their regular workplace policies to address public health concerns. While most employers have shifted to working remotely, some essential employers remain open for business. Given the contagiousness of COVID-19, a single cough is enough to concern nearby individuals. Yet,

We previously blogged about the new paid emergency sick leave and family leave programs under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Both programs require employers to provide paid leave to employees under certain circumstances relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, employers are entitled to recoup all qualifying paid leave expenses from the U.S. Department

With Governor Cuomo having forced the closure of “non-essential” businesses to combat the spread of COVID-19, many New York business owners are now presented with the difficult task of determining whether, when or how to reduce their workforces. New York’s WARN Act is designed to protect workers and their families, and requires employers to give

Businesses are continuing to grapple with the myriad challenges brought on by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Workforce reductions are an unfortunate but inevitable byproduct of this national crisis. Employers across the country are considering layoffs (ranging from marginal to mass), furloughs and reductions in employees’ hours and wages. However, employers must not make such decisions

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which, as we discussed in an earlier blog post, provides for paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that provides for paid emergency family leave is referred to as the

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which, as we discussed in an earlier blog post, provides for paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that provides for paid emergency family leave is referred to as the

We have been fielding calls every day from employers who are struggling to determine their obligations under New York’s new emergency paid sick leave law and the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The aim of this post is to provide the simplest explanation of the circumstances in which these laws do and do

Tonight, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The passage of this law further complicates the web of paid leave laws that New York employers must navigate, given that, less than forty-eight hours ago, Governor Cuomo announced an agreement with legislators on a paid leave law at the state level.