We previously blogged about a decision of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) that invalidated portions of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (USDOL) final rule (Original Final Rule) relating to paid coronavirus leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). To recap, that ruling: (1) invalidated USDOL’s rule

In response to the novel coronavirus pandemic, Congress enacted the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Among other things, this law provides employees impacted by COVID-19 with paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that relates to paid emergency sick leave is referred to as

On April 22, 2020, during the first-ever remote hearing of the New York City Council (Council), several bills were introduced relating to employment matters and the COVID-19 pandemic. These bills, which have been referred to as the “Essential Workers Bill of Rights,” were sent to committees for further hearings. It is expected that the Council

The Wage and Hour Division of the United States Department of Labor (USDOL) has enacted a temporary rule (“Rule”) regarding the implementation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The Rule clarifies the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) portions of the FFCRA.

By

We previously blogged about the new paid emergency sick leave and family leave programs under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Both programs require employers to provide paid leave to employees under certain circumstances relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, employers are entitled to recoup all qualifying paid leave expenses from the U.S. Department

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which, as we discussed in an earlier blog post, provides for paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that provides for paid emergency family leave is referred to as the

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which, as we discussed in an earlier blog post, provides for paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that provides for paid emergency family leave is referred to as the

We have been fielding calls every day from employers who are struggling to determine their obligations under New York’s new emergency paid sick leave law and the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The aim of this post is to provide the simplest explanation of the circumstances in which these laws do and do