One year ago, Congress enacted the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Among other things, the FFCRA created paid leave programs under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA).  In brief, EPSLA and EFMLEA required employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide varying amounts

Before the new year, New York’s COVID-19 leave law received less attention than its federal counterparts, the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (“EPSLA”) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (“EFMLEA”). However, because paid leave under EPSLA and EFMLEA expired on December 31, 2020, New York’s law is now the subject of renewed

Earlier this year, New York State enacted a new  sick leave law, which becomes effective Wednesday, September 30. This law requires all New York State employers to allow employees to accrue sick leave. Although accrual of sick leave begins on the 30th, employees may not take the leave until January 1, 2021.

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We previously blogged about a decision of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) that invalidated portions of the U.S. Department of Labor’s (USDOL) final rule (Original Final Rule) relating to paid coronavirus leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). To recap, that ruling: (1) invalidated USDOL’s rule

In response to the novel coronavirus pandemic, Congress enacted the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Among other things, this law provides employees impacted by COVID-19 with paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that relates to paid emergency sick leave is referred to as

On April 22, 2020, during the first-ever remote hearing of the New York City Council (Council), several bills were introduced relating to employment matters and the COVID-19 pandemic. These bills, which have been referred to as the “Essential Workers Bill of Rights,” were sent to committees for further hearings. It is expected that the Council

The Wage and Hour Division of the United States Department of Labor (USDOL) has enacted a temporary rule (“Rule”) regarding the implementation of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The Rule clarifies the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (EFMLEA) portions of the FFCRA.

By

We previously blogged about the new paid emergency sick leave and family leave programs under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). Both programs require employers to provide paid leave to employees under certain circumstances relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, employers are entitled to recoup all qualifying paid leave expenses from the U.S. Department