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Businesses are continuing to grapple with the myriad challenges brought on by the novel coronavirus pandemic. Workforce reductions are an unfortunate but inevitable byproduct of this national crisis. Employers across the country are considering layoffs (ranging from marginal to mass), furloughs and reductions in employees’ hours and wages. However, employers must not make such decisions

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which, as we discussed in an earlier blog post, provides for paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that provides for paid emergency family leave is referred to as the

On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) which, as we discussed in an earlier blog post, provides for paid emergency sick leave and paid emergency family leave in certain circumstances. The portion of the FFCRA that provides for paid emergency family leave is referred to as the

We have been fielding calls every day from employers who are struggling to determine their obligations under New York’s new emergency paid sick leave law and the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The aim of this post is to provide the simplest explanation of the circumstances in which these laws do and do

Tonight, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The passage of this law further complicates the web of paid leave laws that New York employers must navigate, given that, less than forty-eight hours ago, Governor Cuomo announced an agreement with legislators on a paid leave law at the state level.

Employers have a duty to provide employees with a workplace that is free from recognized hazards that are likely to cause death or serious physical harm. Given the rapid spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), what should New York employers do to fulfill this duty while balancing legitimate business needs? And, what legal pitfalls must

Most employers recognize that there are situations in which they might be liable to their employees. For example, employees may bring claims against an employer for wrongful termination. If an employee is injured on the job, he or she may have a claim arising from such injuries. Employers often have a blind spot, however, when

Wage and hour lawsuits (e.g., those involving an employee’s claim that he or she was deprived of overtime pay) under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) pose unique challenges for employers. This is due in part to the fact that the FLSA entitles a prevailing plaintiff to the payment of his or her attorneys’ fees

The New York Human Rights Law has long prohibited employers from engaging in unlawful discrimination or harassment of employees. It has historically applied only to employers with four or more employees. However, as of February 8, 2020, the law applies to all employers in New York, regardless of size.

This change in the law means